omg.wtf.bbq.

because arshan’s too cheap to license OneNote

Browsing Posts tagged java

I haven’t blogged or released much research in the last two years. If you care about that, which I doubt you do, then I’m sorry. I’ve been putting all of my energy into Contrast, a completely new way of finding vulnerabilities in applications. Contrast uses instrumentation to add “sensors” to your running JVM, including in [...]

Javasnoop 1.0 final released with new features, bug fixes, performance enhancements, and more.

I’m flying back from Blackhat today where I presented and officially released JavaSnoop, a tool that makes security testing thick Java clients really, really easy. We use some magically awesome instrumentation and bytecode engineering. Despite the fact that those buzzwords were in play, Blackhat thought they’d hedge their bet on me by putting the talk [...]

The application I beat up for the ESAPI WAF preso at OWASP AppSec DC was JForum. It’s awesome, free, open source forum software that is quite popular (CBS, EA and the Ukrainian government seem to like it). That aside, it’s got serious security problems. I disclosed these problems to them, um, around a month ago [...]

Using “Content-disposition: attachment” when streaming user-uploaded files is unfortunately incomplete protection against all cross-origin issues. Most savvy testers know that without it, a user could send a victim a link directly to a malicious uploaded file or <iframe> it in from their evil site, causing XSS & SSRF. When this header is sent down in [...]

So my co-worker Eric Sheridan was talking about an attack scenario in one of our recent assessments where he left a note to the effect of, “we could download any file with this vulnerability if null byte injections work in Java – testing needed”. Interesting. Five minutes later I’ve got some test cases and as [...]